Black Hole Tears A Star To Bits In Epic Animation

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Black Hole Tears A Star To Bits In Epic Animation
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Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), a particle accelerator lab located in Hamburg, Germany, recently released a new visualization of an amazing phenomenon. The stunning visualization shows a black hole, ripping a star into shreds.

Such an event is called a stellar tidal disruptor. These rarely occur in a typical galaxy, just once every 10,000 years. Following a gravitational interaction with another star or an enormous stellar object, stars generally get attracted to a ravenous black hole with a large force. If the star gets too closer to the maw of the black hole, it gets stretched and devoured. This process is known as spaghettification.

Watch The Striking Animation Below

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The majority of the destruction is caused by gravitational tidal forces. These are pretty much similar to the ones caused by the moon in order to raise tides on Earth. Initially, the outer atmospheric layers of the star get pulled towards the black hole. Then, it spins around its edge, forming an accretion disk, as shown in the video.

Astonishingly, only around 1% of a star’s mass is consumed by a black hole, as claimed by NASA. The remaining 99% gets catapulted back into space in the form of large jets of matter and energy, shooting from the center of the black hole. At times, the cosmos gets lighted up by these energy jets. This gives astronomers on earth a slight chance to catch glimpses of distant, otherwise invisible black holes. Occasionally, neutrinos will be tossed from the black hole.

Some of the star’s material might fall past the event horizon. This is the point after which nothing can escape the black hole, including light. The visualization clearly depicts how swiftly and intensely a black hole can dismember and dispatch a star and shows the extreme dangers of getting closer to such a powerful object.

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